4 Candidates running for 2016 in Taiwan

The presidential election is coming soon in Taiwan. If you need a quick topic when talking to Taiwanese people, politics is definitely a good choice. Taiwanese people are mostly passionate on their political choices. Here are the 4 presidential candidates for 2016 (in no particular order):

1. Tsai Ing-wen 蔡英文

Tsai Ing-Wen
Tsai Ing-Wen

Incumbent chairwoman of the Democratic Progressive Party (DPP). She graduated from the college of Law at National Taiwan University in 1978, she obtained a Master of Laws from Cornell University Law School in 1980 and then a PhD in law from the London School of Economics (1984). Upon her return to Taiwan, she taught law at Soochow University and National Chengchi University both in Taipei, Taiwan.

She was also appointed to the Fair Trade Commission and the Copyright Commission. She served as consultant for the Mainland Affairs Council and the National Security Council

2. Hung Hsiu-chu 洪秀柱

Hung Shiu-Chu
Hung Shiu-Chu

Vice President of the Legislative Yuan and former Deputy Chairperson and Deputy Secretary-General of Kuomintang (KMT).

Having a political background in the field of education, she has focused much of legislative tenure on the quality of, and access to, higher education in Taiwan.

3. James Soong 宋楚瑜

James-Soong
James-Soong

Perhaps the most experienced candidate in government. He founded and chairs the People First Party, a smaller party in the Kuomintang (KMT)-led Pan-Blue Coalition.

Soong began his political career as a Secretary to Premier Chiang Ching-kuo (later President) and rose to prominence as Director-General of the Government Information Office from 1979 to 1984. Soong was the only elected governor of Taiwan Province from 1994 to 1998. This is the 4th time Soong is running for president.

4. Shih Ming-teh 施明德

Shih_Ming-De
Shih_Ming-De

a political activist in Taiwan and was once a political prisoner for 25-and-a-half years. In 1994, he was elected leader of the legalized opposition Democratic Progressive Party. He was also elected legislator in three occasions. Shih’s proposal of a political “Grand Reconciliation” in Taiwan earned him strong rejection from within the Democratic Progressive Party, to which he resigned on November 14, 2000.

In 2006, Shih carried out a massive protest, known as Million Voices Against Corruption, President Chen Must Go, in an effort to force the embattled president Chen Shui-bian to resign.

We will be writing more in-depth articles on the 2016 Presidential Election. Make sure you like, share and follow us on Facebook. Stay tuned.

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